problems leading up to shortages were publicly reported on web sites of the United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency, but the shortages occurred nonetheless. eCOST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) is the longest-running European framework supporting trans-national cooperation among researchers, engineers and scholars across Europe. The problem. The European Medicine Agency (EMA) has warned that the continent could be facing shortages of medicines to treat symptoms of the Wuhan coronavirus. European Medicines Shortages Research Network - addressing supply problems to patients (Medicines Shortages) The problems created by supply shortages of medicines have been widely reported by … The EMA said in a statement, “Both documents lay the foundations for an improved and harmonized EU approach in reporting of and communication on medicines’ shortages and availability issues, a key public health priority for the EU network.”. The global medicines market is increasing as a result of population growth and other factors, which may compound the problem of shortages. For veterinary medicines, shortages are managed by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine. They impact on patients’ health outcomes by causing delays in treatment or forcing changes in treatment regimes as well as inducing a great deal of stress and worry to patients and their families. Medicines shortages are a significant cause of concern for patients, clinicians and our public health. Develop effective governance systems: A close collaboration between EU Member States and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) is needed especially to improve reporting, monitoring and communication on medicine shortages. This guidance is for medicines marketing authorisation holders (MAHs).It gives them an overview of how to report medicines shortages to the Department of Health and … Amid concerns about potential shortages of crucial medicines to treat patients with COVID-19 and other conditions, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) said that new European Union (EU)–level measures are being put into place to help prevent and mitigate supply issues. Medicines are not simple items of commerce, they are an essential component of patient care and in the hospital sector they must be administered to the patient in a timely manner. The second HMA/EMA guideline, “Good practice guidance for communication to the public on medicines’ availability issues”, aimed to enhance and align the European communication on a shortage to improve the awareness of healthcare professionals and patients and the cooperation among European stakeholders (EMA and HMA, 2019b). A shortage of staff that can administer monoclonal antibodies, which have to be given via IV, combined with delays in Covid-19 testing have limited their use. EMA and HMA also published guidance for marketing authorisation holders on detecting and reporting medicines shortages which is based on an agreed harmonised definition of shortages. Problems caused by medicines shortages are serious, threaten patient care in hospitals and require urgent action.